Getting Started Guidelines to Microsoft Forms Limits and Boundaries

Microsoft Forms is a basic lightweight app for quickly collecting information via surveys and quizzes, but you should be aware of its limits.  The strength of Microsoft forms is its licensing.  It’s free to use for anonymous or authenticated users, and the data can be stored in a list or connected to flow to push into other systems, but there are some limits to be aware of especially in relation to using it to build an app.  When do you decide to use a PowerApp vs. a form or even just use the list?  Microsoft Forms is a great way to get started with the new generation of tools in Office 365, but when should you look into the Microsoft ecosystem?  It was when I started pushing the limits that I found there are some limitations in Microsoft Forms.  Even walking through User Voice, you can’t get a clear picture.  I couldn’t find a single place with guidelines on what those limits were that I decided to put together an infographic to simplify the process.  I’m working on a broader infographic for what to use when, and I’m hoping this will simplify the process.  As with all things in Office 365, it’s a moving target and these limits are subject to change anytime, but this is current as of my evaluation and testing on 2/11/2019.  I did see acknowledgement on various forums, but never saw a list of Microsoft Forms Limits in one place so this is my effort to try to consolidate.  Feel free to add your own thoughts in the comments or feedback on my experience as well.  Hopefully this posting will encourage users to weigh in on User Voice options to increase these limits.  Let me know if you see any changes as time goes on.  I will plan to support this list over the coming year… and maybe more with encouragement from the community.

1.  Users Can’t Update or Come back to finish their responses. 

In this limitation users have to fill out the form and be done.  If users might need to come back to change a response such as in an RSVP or if they want to save and come back later to finish, Microsoft Forms is currently not able to support users coming back.

2. Hard Limit of 100 Questions. 

Essentially there is a hard limit of 100 questions in Microsoft Forms.  This boundary does seem like one that should be published and I expect it will be published in the near future.  Of note it really depends on how you ask the questions and what style of questions you’re using as to how this limit is reached.  Some users have experienced the limit at 60 by using different style of questions… see #6 for another example.

3. You are limited to 2 to 10 options on a ranking question. 

If you have 10 ranking questions you can only ask 10 questions.  If you have a ranking question with 2 options you’ll only be able to ask 50 questions.  This can make for an odd survey if you keep finding you’re hitting a limit.

4. Choice Questions store only 60 options. 

This is a soft limit, so you won’t even notice.  You can provide hundreds of options, but only a max of 60 options are stored to viewed in your results.  So imagine you’re asking the user to choose their country.  As a traveler I know there are 193 UN countries, but At&t seems to think there’s a whole lot more than that so they can say they are in a ton more than they actually are.  That aside, if you ask someone to choose their country, you’ll find Microsoft Forms is only storing 60 options.  So when you’ve got users from 90 countries you’ll find only 60 of them were stored.  In my mind that’s pretty serious.  You could ask that question in a text field, but that’s a little strange.

5. You get a max of 4000 characters in a response. 

Imagine your users are giving you feedback and you get a nice essay as a response and find it’s only half there.  Be aware you’ll only get 4000 characters in the long text box response.  I can’t imagine someone pouring their heart out to provide detailed responses and then you get only the first 4000 characters in that response.  Is that enough?  Who knows, but to have it be truncated isn’t cool.

6. Likert scales are limited to 20 questions. 

Just as in the limits above, you might find yourself designing a survey and finding you’re running out of questions.  Be aware.

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If you like the infographic and want to use it in a blog or in your presentations at SharePoint Saturdays or community events, no problem.  This infographic is shareable with creative commons share with attribution.  As long as you include the whole image you’re good to go.  You can download it as a PDF or as an image. 

Join me for a Webinar on this Topic and More

If you liked what you saw here and want more.  You can join me on a Webinar on March 7, 2019 where I’ll be discussing “Apps, Forms, Workflows and Tools of Office 365: What to Use When?”  This webinar is being sponsored by Crow Canyon.  They have built a number of powerful tools to simplify and extend the power of Office 365, so they also frequently hear from their customers where to add value.  In the webinar I’ll be going over each of the Microsoft Apps and Tools and describing their strengths, helping you best understand “when to use what tools” in building out your solutions. 

Tribute to Tom Castiglia, True Community Leader, Gone but Not Forgotten!

Update: See more stories, memories, photos, videos and a memorial for Tom at https://www.forevermissed.com/tomcastiglia/

When I first moved to California, there was one person who made a big impression on my life and it’s never been the same.  Tom Castiglia, President of the SharePoint User Group, and Founder of the .NET User Group in San Diego was all about community.  The first month I was there I had offered to help Tom and the SharePoint Saturday San Diego event committee.  I had some crazy ideas about doing a speaker party on the beach with fusion Hawaiian food and fire and hula dancers.  Tom didn’t shut me down despite the fact I accidentally planned a trip to Colombia and Bolivia over the top of that weekend.  I heard everyone had a great time, but Tom helped me pull it off without hesitation.

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Up bright and early for SharePoint Bloggers breakfast before the keynote and on the second row…  Tom had Passion!!

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The next month I was at the User group with some rough news.  I was in the middle of trying to buy a house with an unknown closing date.  It was during the committee meeting for the user group that I brought up I was out of work and looking.  I didn’t really have any time to make anything happen…  Tom reached out and I believe he stuck his neck out to take a chance on bringing me on at the small San Diego based business.   A day later I was talking to Neal and Arjay and the following Monday I was working with him at Hershey.  I was able to keep our house and with no drama my prayers were answered.

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Some of the Hershey SharePoint team at a recent little reunion.

 

We’d share a room at the upcoming Ignite event, and nearly every waking moment of that event we were together.  My SharePoint friends were his friends, and the San Diego User Group and SharePoint crew got really tight.  Haaron Gonzales, Chris Givens, Randy Williams, Galen, Tony, Ron… you couldn’t find a tighter community.  We adopted David Leveille when he moved to San Diego.  He had a client in San Diego and lived with Tom and Martha for over a month.  Who does that?  Tom (and Martha).  1

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While I was working with Tom at Hershey we had more than a few lunches together.  We shared a lot together.  I saw his work ethic first hand.  A hard worker with a passion for community and friendships.  He told me all about his Old Pros group, and I saw it first hand.  Those guys would do anything for each other.  Very tight knit group.

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The next year in Atlanta for Ignite, Tom, Galen and I got glowing light sabers and we fought with our lazer swords under the laser light show.  Tom believed in my crazy ideas and backed me up when I was feeling spontaneous.  That’s a rare thing.

 

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I went to more baseball games with Tom in the past few years than the rest of my life combined.  He sure loved baseball.

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Tom knew how to make people feel wanted and how best to organize an event.  Last years SharePoint Saturday San Diego Zoiner opened his home for the speaker dinner.  It took things to a much more personal level.  Something I’ve strove for.  This community is more than a bunch of geeks.  It’s family.  We all know that.

 

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It didn’t take much to convince Tom to join me on a crazy adventure to SharePoint Saturday in Cuba.

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Politics doesn’t divide the SharePoint Community.  Tom, Rob, Chris and I met with the Cuban SharePoint folks who sacrificed to tell their stories.  I cherish the memories of walking through the dark streets of Havana with Tom.  He put a lot of trust in me.  It was one of the first times they’d left Ben alone and for so long.  Tom tells the story that Ben had a secret, but due to their strong relationship, he couldn’t hold it a secret for long and Tom would handle the situation like a good father would.

Tom was the glue that has kept the community here in southern California together.  Through ups and downs and thick and thin…  Even when Microsoft said we couldn’t keep meeting in San Diego, he pushed to get us what we needed to keep going.  He has put his own money into buying pizzas on more than one occasion, traveling to SharePoint events all over the country and beyond.  His impact cannot be measured.  As a Nintex vTE he helped people for free all over the world, and those developers and engineers are deeply indebted to his graciousness and technical knowledge.

 

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Tom invited me and a few SharePoint friends to his 50th birthday party.  This wasn’t the first birthday he invited me to.  During the first year we moved here, he invited me into his home and my little boy Dean danced and danced at his party.  We all felt comfortable at Tom’s house…  We could be ourselves.  Being at Tom’s house belt like being at home…  being there felt like family.

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Only a week ago, Tom helped me do some shopping and helped me throw the biggest party I’ve ever had.  I had commitments on Thursday and Friday and he took time out of his week to go shopping mid week.  Super nice guy.  Tons of Love.  He opened his heart and we’ll never be the same.   I miss my friend, but know he’ll be waiting for us all for a big party on the other side… with a brass cup and some ginger beer.  I’m sure he’s working with the Angels on their Records Management in the meantime.

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Tom, I’ll miss your non judgmental smile and your never give up and do what it takes to make it work personality.  I promise to do what I can to keep the community together, and I’ll never forget the way you made us all feel… loved.

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If you know or were inspired by Tom, I invite you to attend Tom Castiglia’s Funeral which will be on Tuesday February 5th at 10am. http://tomcastiglia.eventbrite.com

Saint Gregory the Great Church, Scripps Ranch, 11451 Blue Cypress Drive, San Diego, CA 92131

How can you help? In the beginning the recommendation was to donate to the American Heart Association. Even better, now there is a Go Fund Me to help with Funeral and Burial expenses… Thanks for anything you can do.

Seven SharePoint and Office 365 Predictions for 2019 and Reflections

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(I snapped this photo in Indonesia.  I hope you like it!)


1. SharePoint 2019 will become the new base standard, but the community bloggers and speakers will get over it very quickly.  It won’t feel new by June.   Where usually a product is new for a couple of years.  Now the on prem releases will feel dated nearly immediately. We won’t see hardly any posts unfortunately.  

2. Teams will get a TON of press and become a leading workload (fastest growing) for Office 365.  Microsoft Sales will CARE most about Teams and Azure.  The Teams team will really dial in the MVP community and connect in solid ways.

3. Digital Workspaces will move from being buzz words to being company initiatives.  Some companies will refocus intranet teams to focus on The Digital Workspace. Productivity will change based on personalized organizational insights through analytics.  Analytics will be big in gaining new insights and driving the interfaces of our personalized workspaces.

4. Chat Bots will go from being seen as a gimmick to being more common corporate projects.  Today chat bots are seen as squishy dev projects working with APIs, but we’re likely to see chat bots be more productized and with plug and play integration.  I expect to see large enterprises who have sprint initiatives feeding the bots.  HR and Support will find each other to support these initiatives, sparking a marriage.

5. Digital Transformation – What was previously seen as stages for moving to the cloud will now be more about looking at streamlining business processes with taking advantage of investments in AI for automation.  

6.  The Battle of the year will be Microsoft Teams and Slack.  Microsoft’s arsenals are loaded and Skype is dead.  This battle won’t end in a year.  Atlassian alignment with Slack is going to cause some significant changes inside organizations.

7.  Microsoft will double down on Mixed Reality.  The story will really start coming together even if it sounds ahead of it’s time.  Microsoft does have their work cut out.  Remote assist + Teams + Hololens… It’s ahead of it’s time, but solid.  The community really doesn’t seem to understand SharePoint spaces.  I think it will take a year unfortunately for the right stories to come together, but 3D/360 content viewing is a solid investment especially if you look at 3-5 years.  Engineering will start sharing more 3D/360.

8. PowerPack will be a big thing.  Licensing confusion will rise, but PowerBI, PowerApps, and Flow will gain in adoption and usage in a significant way, and Microsoft will find a way to promote these products in a more streamlined way.

Here’s a review of last year’s post including my thoughts.  Love to hear what you think…

8 Predictions for SharePoint & Office 365 in 2018

1. People will look to Skip SharePoint 2016 and go to 2019. It will be much better received than 2016 was, but it will still be somewhat lackluster (never will it be like it was back in the good old days of dedicated SPCs for SharePoint launches). In the first year of SharePoint 2019 release it will surpass 2016 as an install base. (2016 still hasn’t surpassed 2013.)

I haven’t seen any numbers, I think we’ve already heard great things about 2019.  I expect to hear more at SPC. 

2. Hub sites will become the preferred way of doing Information Architecture in SharePoint and deep portal structures will be flattened as a best practice. Note there will be many who cry foul and it will cause heated debates.

Hub Sites are preferred way to do Information Architecture in SharePoint Now.

3. OneDrive on Demand will become a great drive to Windows 10. Sync for SharePoint will be carried along as a benefit and client sync for SharePoint will have its greatest adoption since groove.

OneDrive on Demand has been huge for OneDrive.

4. Modern Team Sites, Modern Lists, and Themes will soon become consistent with the expectation for status quo for SharePoint and a big line will be drawn for OLD SharePoint vs. New SharePoint based on what comes in 2019 and what’s in O365 now.

This prediction stands.  Teams and Modern are the way.

5. WSPs are Dead – The community will abhor them and it will be an insult to think of installing them. As a result even third party solutions will need to rethink how they not only support apps for online but also on prem.

True.  No one is creating anything in WSPs now.

6. Groups will cause further confusion in 2018, but Teams will become the darling of Microsoft sales for collab as it activates multiple workloads.

I think some of the confusion is gone now that Team sites = group template, but Teams is definitely been a big winner.

7. Microsoft AI (Simple automation, auto classification and extraction) will start to make its way into SharePoint Online amongst other workloads.

True. Microsoft has provided extraction through OCR and it shipped for OneDrive & SharePoint Online.  Not just that, but also Flow is now in lists with simple approvals.

8. Simple Communication Site based Intranets (and Intranet in a box solutions) + Hub sites will gain favor for Office 365 adopters. Deep complicated Intranets will fall out of favor in a huge significant industry wide way.

True. I do believe Intranet in a box solutions and even lowered expectations for more out of the box cloud based solutions as either digital workspaces or as a baseline for more has accelerated both deployment and adoption.

In 2015 predictions I called out worth mentioning

Mobile will become more important in SharePoint world – The new mobile app is really good.  The new search feature is the best thing that’s happened to mobile.

SharePoint gets cool again – It’s really happened.  SharePoint has really improved and looking at the Top Intranets… there’s nothing better right now.  Teams is the only challenge based on the interface, and with the new SPFX investments in Teams. 

Three Tiers to Increase to Unlimited Storage in OneDrive for Business

In recent history, Microsoft quietly supported 1TB to 5TB.  Many customers didn’t notice that change.  Many Office 365 Admins don’t realize the limit is NOT 1TB.  This quiet update to the pricing plans with the reference to unlimited storage with the little circled i with more information has not really made it to general mindset of the community and many customers still support competing products not realizing that OneDrive as well supports UNLIMITED STORAGE for users!  A simple search for OneDrive Unlimited results in old information no recent discussions.

Why would you not want 25TB quotas for your users especially those who refuse to move because there isn’t enough cloud storage or they are worried about the cost?  OneDrive just got 25x more cool and beyond!

 

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I put together the very sharable infographic above, so you can help promote the fact that OneDrive for Business is now Unlimited.  Feel free to use the image how every you’d like feel free to download it or use it in your slides.

Download the OneDrive Unlimited Storage Infographic.

It’s not hard to give all your users 5TB of storage by default.  Simply go to https://admin.onedrive.com/?v=StorageSettings and change the default 1TB to 5TB

 

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Or through the Office 365 Admin Powershell:

To change default quota to 5TB  for OneDrive for Business for entire Tenant

Set-SPOTenant -OneDriveStorageQuota 5120

To change quota for a user:

Set-SPOSite -Identity <user’s OneDrive URL> -StorageQuota <quota>

Note Subscriptions with less than five users receive 1 TB of personal cloud storage per user.  In fact all start that way.

“Customers will initially be provisioned 1 TB of personal cloud storage per user in OneDrive for Business. You may increase the default OneDrive for Business storage space to up to 5 TB per user with the help of your Office 365 administrator once the 1TB quota is 90% full.”

Thats the tricky part.  Microsoft is basically saying wait until a user has reached that capacity, but getting to 5 TB default you don’t need to wait, but going to 25 TB quotas you’ll need MS support help with justification such as a user who is close.

“Whenever you need cloud storage beyond the initial 5 TB, open a case with Microsoft technical support to request it. Additional cloud storage will be granted as follows:

  • When a user has filled their 5 TB of OneDrive for Business storage to at least 90% capacity, Microsoft will increase your default storage space in OneDrive for Business to up to 25 TB per user (admins may set a lower per user limit if they wish to).
  • For any user that reaches at least 90% capacity of their 25 TB of OneDrive for Business storage, additional cloud storage will be provided as 25 TB SharePoint team sites to individual users. This additional storage is provided to the tenant by way of credit.

To see how much personal cloud storage you are using, your Office 365 administrator can go to the OneDrive Admin Center to manage their users’ personal cloud storage.”

See Change your users’ OneDrive storage space using PowerShell for more information on how Office 365 administrators can manage user storage in OneDrive for Business.

 

I had heard rumors that the 15GB per file limit was increased.  I have not seen this play out.  Uploading a file of 15.1 GB failed. I confirmed 15GB max individual file is still the case.  I’m hoping to see this increased for video files.  clip_image002

You can determine your personal quota by navigating to your onedrive for business and appending /_layouts/15/storman.aspx?root=Documents  It’s also in site settings… look for Storage Manager.  The nick name was StorMan

References:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/onedrive/set-default-storage-space

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/onedrive/change-user-storage

https://products.office.com/en-us/onedrive-for-business/compare-onedrive-for-business-plans

https://products.office.com/en-us/business/compare-more-office-365-for-business-plans

Joel Oleson Awarded MVP – 10 years of Community Building in Pictures

I’m humbled and excited to be recognized by Microsoft as an MVP for Office Apps and Services.  It’s been about 11 years since I left Microsoft back in March 2008, and started my journey to connect to IT communities in every country in the world. 


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10 years later, and over 100 speaking engagements, and 100 communities later…


Here are a few of the highlights…

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It started with Jordan… my first community visit after Microsoft


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SharePoint in London and on the battlefields of Gettysburg


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Many Many Share-Point I Mean SharePints later


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From Bethlehem

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To 3x in Lima Peru

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Many Share-A-Okes!

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You wouldn’t believe the LadyGaga SharePoint Outing in Sweden

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SharePoint Bermuda…. Speaker shorts required

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SharePoint Saturday Jamaica!  They said it wasn’t possible!

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Sharing the Point in Vietnam in 2011

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SharePoint Singapore x4 including User Group, SPS, and TechEd South East Asia x3 (man I miss that event)

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SharePoint Malta

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SharePoint Amsterdam x3

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SharePoint in Czech


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SharePoint Sweden (SEF!) x 3 + ESPC

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Trinidad and Dominican Republic

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SharePoint in Morocco

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SharePoint in Slovenia (Thrive) x8


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Getting interviewed in Berlin by Michael Greth… about 8 years ago.  5+ trips to Germany for the community.

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Including a European SharePoint Conference where we saw the 20 year anniversary of the Wall topple!

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SharePoint in Iceland!

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More than a few SharePoint Limos.  (Many photos not included to protect the innocent Smile)

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SharePoint Manilla

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They said it wasn’t possible to do a SharePoint event in Georgia

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SharePoint Bangladesh… Thanks MJ!

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Ecuador

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and of course one of my favorites… Chile x2  and Costa Rica x4 with Ricardo and Crew

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The Latin American SharePoint Community is still very strong

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Guyana, Colombia, Mexico, El Salvador

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And many trips down with Share The Point Under to Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and Signapore… Thanks Debbie!

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75 signed up in Yeravan Armenia…. but 125 showed up!!

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We made it happen in Bolivia

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and in Venezuela

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From Nigeria

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To Ghana

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And Nairobi

SharePoint in Antarctica

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The bottom of the world

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Arab community

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To Tunisia

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So many fun crazy times at SPC

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and Brazil

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and Pakistan

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and Egypt

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Bulgaria

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SharePoint in Full Robes in UAE Dubai

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SharePoint has definitely made the rounds in the middle east

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Central Asia Tour in Uzbekistan

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Azerbaijan

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And in Kurdish Iraq!

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Sri Lanka

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SharePoint Saturday Algeria

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On the Top of Africa –  Kilimonjaro

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To the Bottom of the world – Yes that is Dan Holme… I took this shot Smile

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Many Late nights

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Hanging out with fun people who make big impressions…

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Who are these young pups?

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To the ends…

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Ukraine and Russia… it’s more fun with friends…

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The Russian Speaking community is fantastic!

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Across deserts and mountains

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SPS Cuba (previously forbidden places)

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Building relationships in the Persian community and then not getting allowed to see them was tough, but I’m happy to say Persian language packs in SharePoint 2010 on have a small contribution in part to my relationship with an MVP who’s business is in Dubai that I met 10 years ago.  Thanks Neo!


Thanks much to the whole community, with special mention to those who left a whole in my heart…

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I miss you!  Dave, John, Abir, and Patrick

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Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays!  Happy New Year!  Thanks to the community… it’s been a lot of fun these past 10 years!


Thanks to those that believed in me and made it enjoyable.  I really love our community…  I hope you can see that.  The recognition has always been just a bonus, but it does mean a lot.  It’s been a lot easier to find people when they’ve been recognized by Microsoft. Community does change lives.


Hubify: Create Hub Sites in SharePoint Online to 5 Steps to Improve Usability Series

The new site hubs already need to be demistified.  Much of the way people speak about hub sites is already incorrect understanding.  Hub sites are not a new template, but are simply an existing Team or Communication site or taking an existing site and enabling it.  Many don’t realize the Hubs have rolled out.  This is not a new template, this is a feature that can be enabled via powershell with new association UI coming soon.  You can read more about the release and information on Hub sites by Mark Kashman.

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Hubs can improve your global navigation, rollup activities and provide search scopes…

The easiest way of verifying you’re ready to go is by running in powershell:

Get-SPOHubSite
This will lists hub sites or hub site information.

  1. Scoped Search – If you search within the hub site, it will automatically provide results from all the associated sites.
  2. Activity Webpart rollup of associated sites (This is a good way to determine if the hub was setup properly.)
  3. News Webpart rollup of News from associated site (Now you know another reason why I suggest communication site)
  4. Hub Navigation – Cross Navigation in the top nav bar to associated sites
  5. Consistent Logo and information across all associated sites
  6. Consistent look across all associated sites.  The simple “Change the look” option is what is used.

Personally I’ll be prescriptive for you and help you understand why.  While you can take an exisiting site and turn it into a hub site, it’s better to start with a new communication site… Why?  A new team site is a group and contains a lot more than you’d need for a hub.  You likely won’t need a planner, inbox, calendar, and other group items.  A communication site, focuses on the new modern interface with a simplified, but focused site.  An old classic site doesn’t have modern pages and also doesn’t have the new updated webparts.  While you can take an old site through the steps to get updated there are a few examples of reasons why.  Classic sites don’t have the new webparts like activity, and they don’t have the new pages which the new webparts should be listed on them.

1. Create a new Communication site.  Doesn’t matter which type, a Topic or Showcase is fine.

2. Add Activity Feed

3. Open powershell and add the Site as a hub.  There is currently no other way to do this other than in powershell for setting up the initial parent hub sites.

Register-SPOHubSite https://contoso.sharepoint.com/sites/Marketing

Note: You should not copy and paste powershell commands from the browser.  It’s often messed up due to the dashes not coming across properly.

4. Either Add News or make sure it is displayed.

5. On the child sites (If the UI is showing up) you can Click Settings (gear icon) > Site information > hub site association and select the desired hub.  You’ll only see the hubs you have permission to associate to. And then click Save. You will see the hub navigation appear above. The site itself will inherit the hub theme, and news and activities will begin to flow up to the hub site home page – along with a search crawl of content for any site associated to the hub site.In powershell associate a Site to the new hubsite.  Or you can do it in powershell.

Add-SPOHubSiteAssociation https://contoso.sharepoint.com/sites/Research  -HubSite https://contoso.sharepoint.com/sites/Marketing


NOTE: You can currently only add 50 Hubsites per tenant, but no maximum number of sites associated with any given hub.  A site can only have one parent hub site.

6. Gear/Settings – Change Look and Feel on parent – Once the hub site has been established, you’ll then want to further set it up and refine it for that organization –a preferred theme, so the hub site carries the right name and logo

7. Navigation – You should see the HubNav show up after some time.  Some may decide to call it sites or subsites, in a single label. You may need to move sites to subnavigation as you add sites. the preferred navigation elements, and the desired layout for news, sites and highlighted content. The navigation is NOT a webpart.  You won’t see how to configure that as it isn’t as intuitive.  Note there is a fix coming to add the nav to the hamburger menu when on smaller screens.

Note: Sites can only belong to one Hub. For example a site in Europe cannot belong to both the EU hub and the HR Hub.

8. Mobile – SharePoint hub sites have now been rolled out to 100% to all tenants worldwide in Office 365, including enterprise, education and government customers. Also, the SharePoint mobile apps have been updated in the production versions to fully support them

Troubleshooting: Once you’ve setup your associations it can take a couple of hours  or more after proper indexing to get the scoped search, navigation, and rollups working.  Don’t fret.  Search is used for rolling up News, Activities, and more.

Now that you’ve got lots of Hub Sites, you should plan on an Office 365 Home site… the parent of all HUBS.  We’ll talk about this one more later.

Key Powershell commands for setting up hubsites:

Register-SPOHubSite
Enables the hub site feature on a site to make it a hub site.

Register-SPOHubSite https://contoso.sharepoint.com/sites/Marketing

Add-SPOHubSiteAssociation
Adds a new association between a site and a hub site.

Add-SPOHubSiteAssociation https://contoso.sharepoint.com/sites/Research  -HubSite https://contoso.sharepoint.com/sites/Marketing

Bonus Related Powershell:

Remove-SPOHubSiteAssociation
Removes an association between a site and a hub site.

Set-SPOHubSite
Sets the hub site information such as name, logo, and description.

Get-SPOHubSite
Lists hub sites or hub site information.

Grant-SPOHubSiteRights
Grants rights to users or security groups to access the hub site.  You can do normal permissions.

Revoke-SPOHubSiteRights
Revokes rights for specified principals to a hub site.

Unregister-SPOHubSite
Disables the hub site feature on a site.

Office 365 SharePoint, Teams, Groups 20x big storage quota increase is game changer!

I am very excited to see the new massive increase in base storage for the Office 365 tenant.  At an organization with 5000 people this means we go from a simple 3.5 TB tenant base storage to an impressive 51 TB.  This will not only instill confidence that we can store a lot more, but now departments that have a couple of TB of storage, we no longer need to divide up workloads.  It means a more simplified migration. 

Aaron Rimmer posted on Friday about the massive Office 365 storage increase to go in effect July 2018. 

“Today we are announcing a 20x increase in the SharePoint Online per user license storage allocation. This will increase to 1 TB plus 10 GB per user license purchased, up from 1 TB plus .5 GB per user license purchased. Note this does not include SharePoint Online kiosk plans including Office 365 F1 and Microsoft 365 F1.”

Those rolling out Teams, Groups, and Yammer can feel much better about their ability to scale.  I’ve heard people concerned over max tenant sizes.  This should help alleviate those concerns.  25TB site collections are now within reach without a lot of extra cost.  Teams moving large PSDs, images, drawings and raw video can now include more of the files and the experience is better with the hundreds of preview capabilities that Microsoft has been adding.

I’ve been thinking about what this would mean in an on premise SharePoint environment to 20x to go from 2TB to 40TB as an example.  That would be like going from a small database cluster to a large SAN environment.  This would be a huge deal.  Those who have been paying for the storage will appreciate this, but also those migrating content will be happy to see real PB environments becoming a reality overnight.

Personally I’m now thinking about those conversations of departments that were concerned about 2-3 TB file storage environments that may have been going to other solutions now seriously look at consolidating in a scalable environment that looks like it can support a much larger scale than previously thought.  When it was hitting the pocketbook at around 2.5TB to now have it be closer to 50TB is a big deal.  Thanks to those that made this happen.  Let’s keep it going in this direction.  We like it when what was a perceived limit is pushed up in a significant way.

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